Contributors

for July/August 2012

  • David Beal is an undergraduate at Columbia University, where he coedits a film journal called Double Exposure (doubleexposurefilmjournal.tumblr.com) and programs for student radio at WKCR.
  • Andy Beta has written about music for Spin, Pitchfork, the Los Angeles Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Village Voice, and provided both an interview with Alan Bishop as well as a map of failed ethnomusicology in Thailand for a previous issue of the Believer. He has a column about electronic music for MTV Hive and can be heard tweeting @betaworldpeace.
  • Alvin Buenaventura occasionally publishes comics and books with Pigeon Press. He is also the editor for the recently released monograph The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist.
  • Brock Clarke is the author of five books of fiction, most recently the novels Exley and An Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England. His short fiction and essays have been published widely in a number of magazines, newspapers, and anthologies. He teaches at Bowdoin College, and lives with his family in Portland, Maine.
  • Jemaine Clement is a New Zealand–based comedian, actor, and musician, best known as one half of the musical comedy duo Flight of the Conchords (along with Bret McKenzie).
  • Peter Coviello is a professor of English at Bowdoin College, where he talks mostly about Whitman, joy, Mormon polygamy, and American literature. His newest book is Tomorrow’s Parties: Sex and the Untimely in Nineteenth-Century American Literature.
  • Daniel Handler writes books under his own name and as Lemony Snicket.
  • Anthony Heilbut’s books include Thomas Mann: Eros and Literature and The Fan Who Knew Too Much (just published by Knopf), from which this essay is adapted. Albums he produced have won the Grand Prix du Disque and Grammy Award.
  • Bob Hicok’s seventh book, Elegy Owed, is due out from Copper Canyon in 2013.
  • Nick Hornby is the author of six novels, the most recent of which is Juliet, Naked, and a memoir, Fever Pitch. He is also the author of Songbook, a finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award for music criticism, and editor of the short-story collection Speaking with the Angel. His screenplay for An Education was nominated for an Academy Award. He lives in North London.
  • As a child, Calvin Johnson dreamed of decentralizing pop culture with pencil and maraca. As an adult, he lives within walking distance of the Dub Narcotic Studio in Olympia, Washington.
  • Reese Okyong Kwon’s stories have been published or are forthcoming in the Kenyon Review, Ploughshares, the Southern Review, and elsewhere. She has received scholarships from Yaddo and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference.
  • Cole Louison is the author of The Impossible and the forthcoming Fish House Punch.
  • Rachael Maddux has written about music things for Pitchfork, the Oxford American, eMusic, and Paste. She lives in Decatur, Georgia.
  • Dave Mandl is a producer/DJ at WFMU and music editor at the Brooklyn Rail. His writing has appeared in the Wire, the Rumpus, the Village Voice, and Yeti. He coedited the books Radiotext(e) (with Neil Strauss) and Cassette Mythos (with Robin James).
  • Greil Marcus is the author of Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the Twentieth Century, Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock ‘n’ Roll Music, and The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice, and other books. His column, Real Life Rock Top Ten, runs monthly in the Believer.
  • Jack Pendarvis has written three books.
  • Jeremy Schmidt is a doctoral student at UCLA.
  • Madeleine Schwartz has contributed to the New Yorker online, among other publications.
  • Martin Seay’s writing has appeared in MAKE, Joyland, Gargoyle, and the Gettysburg Review. He lives in Chicago with his spouse, the writer Kathleen Rooney, and maintains the weblog New Strategies for Invisibility.
  • Lindsay Zoladz is a contributing editor at Pitchfork, and her writing has also been published by Salon, Bitch, and the Washington City Paper. She lives in Washington, D.C.